The Jewish New Year, is celebrated in 2014 from sundown on September 24 to nightfall on September 26.

Rosh Hashanan Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in 2014 from sundown on September 24 to nightfall on September 26. The Hebrew date for Rosh Hashanah is 1 Tishrei 5775.

Though Rosh Hashanah literally means "head of the year," the holiday actually takes place on the first two days of the Hebrew month of Tishrei, which is the seventh month on the Hebrew calendar. This is because Rosh Hashanah, one of four new years in the Jewish year, is considered the new year of people, animals and legal contracts. In the Jewish oral tradition, Rosh Hashanah marks the completion of the creation of the world. (...)

The new year is the only Jewish holiday that is observed for two days by all Jews (other holidays are observed for just one day within the Land of Israel) as it is also the only major holiday that falls on a new moon.

A common greeting on Rosh Hashanah is shana tovah u'metukah, Hebrew for "a good and sweet new year." Many traditional Rosh Hashanah foods -- apples and honey, raisin challah, honey cake and pomegranate -- are eaten, in part, for this reason.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com/

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